Whaler Restoration – Electrical

Installing and wiring all of the electrical components was probably the most fun part of this entire restoration. Here's all that was done:1. The battery was installed under the port console. This was done to 1. move a little weight to the port side of the boat and 2. make use of the relatively unused room beneath the console. Footmans loops were screwed and 4200'ed into the deck. (This may actually not hold, and the screws will most likely pull out with the weight of the battery). If so, I'll epoxy a piece of starboard to the deck, and then mount the battery to that. Blue lashing straps are used to hold down the battery (wrapping around the battery and attaching to the footmans loops). 2. 4 gauge battery cables…
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Whaler Restoration – Rub Rail Part #2

With the bow light installed, finishing the installation of the rub rail involved drilling a hole into the hull to run the power cable from under the rub rail to inside the hull.  I used some 4200 to seal the hole inside the hull, then installed a stainless clamshell to finish that job. I then squeezed in the rubber insert around the entire length of the hull and over the wires, hiding and protecting them. 4 large screws and more 4200 (not pictured) attached the rubber insert to the stern.  I'm very happy with the look of the all white rub rail.  Very clean! [srizonfbalbum id=24]
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Whaler Restoration – Bow Light Fabrication & Install

Installing the bow light took much more time and way more than work I expected... but I guess that's been the case with every part of this restore.The recommended installation of the bow light required cutting into the rub rail so that the assembly fit flush to the deck. But I didn't want to cut into a perfectly brand new rub rail. So, to account for the gap and to help the base of the assembly sit flush, I needed to raise it about a quarter inch Marine lumber to the rescue! This 1/4" x 6" x 12" block cost about $20 and took me roughly 3 hours of sawing, dremeling, and sanding to get it shaped just right. All cuts and corners were smoothed and one edge even tapered…
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Whaler Restoration – Console Rigging

It was hard mentally to do, but it was finally time to drill into the beautifully finished mahogany and install the steering and mechanical controls, as well as the 6-rocker fused switch (more on that in a later post). Good news is I measured way more than twice and only had to cut once. All of the cabling is routed through the under seat storage and will come out the other side clean and protected. I won’t bundle the cabling and install a protective sleeve until I do the electrical wiring. Nice finishing touches I thought were the new teak steering wheel cap, and 2.5" diameter grommet under the seat. [srizonfbalbum id=22]
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Whaler Restoration – Dri-Dek Installation

The Whaler blue top paint looks amazing on the interior of the hull. But I wanted something to protect the deck, but also washable and removable. Say hello to Dri-Dek, interlocking 12”x12” rubber tiles. The closest color to Whaler blue offered was the pool blue color. The pictures really don’t do it justice, as in person, it blends in much better. Plus if I get tired of it, it takes all of 5 minutes to uninstall. I used gray for under the seat and consoles, as these areas are less visible and will have a tank and battery installed on top of them. [srizonfbalbum id=21]
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Whaler Restoration – Mahogany Installation

After 12 coats of Captains 1015, I decided that I was DONE varnishing. Like I could not do any more. Not even one more coat. LOL. So I spent the last week or so installing the interior into the boat. I was very nervous drilling and screwing into the actual hull of the boat, but I used 4200 to seal where I could, and I was pleasantly surprised with how well it came out. The 2 consoles required some last minute modifications to fit flush with the deck of the boat, so I called on my handy neighbor Andy, who is one hell of a carpenter and has all of the tools for the job. He measured at least 3 times, broke out his new table saw, and cut the…
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Whaler Restoration – Hull Id Plate & Drain Tube Installation

In addition to Boston Whalers' own stenciling system on the inside of the transom, the FBSA (Federal Boating Safety Act) of 1971 introduced regulations stating that boat manufacturers were required to affix Hull Identification Numbers to each boat produced. BW chose to put this metal plate on the outboard side of the transom, starboard side, within 2 inches of the gunwale. Well, the original metal id plate on this hull was corroded and not even readable, so I was able to order a replacement HID plate from the same company who produced my graphics, Magic Brush. The original plate was installed with rivets, but I opted to use some 3M 4200 marine adhesive/sealant and screws for the installation. My Hull Id Number is: BWC B2949M75A. Here's the translation:Boston Whaler, Serial…
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Whaler Restoration – Vinyl Graphics

Since varnishing of the interior is still under way, I figured I'd step away from that monotonous task and apply the Boston Whaler logo and registration numbers. I ordered the OEM Red Boston Whaler logo from a company called Magic Brush out of Central Florida. They are currently the ONLY source for OEM graphics for any of the old Boston Whaler hulls. In keeping with the classic red, I also got matching registration numbers. Installation was pretty straightforward. I researched the physical placement of the Boston Whaler logo from the factory back in the 70's, measured, marked with painters tape, measured again and again, then pressed them on. They're simple. but they definitely make the hull pop. [srizonfbalbum id=18]
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Whaler Restoration – Hardware Chrome Plating

Replacing the OEM hardware for a classic Boston Whaler can be quite expensive.  Getting your original hardware re-plated and chromed can be just as much.  Since I had no damage with any of my hardware, I went with getting it all re-chromed.  I found a local company here in Madisonville to do the work, and while the owner did a great job with the finish, I can't recommend him because of how he attempted to price gouge me and even threaten to strip all of the pieces when I expressed my unhappiness with the transaction.  But that's another story, and I will be posting some very truthful and negative reviews of his business.  Nonetheless, take a look at the work.  Pieces finished and re-chromed included: Bow & Stern lifting and…
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Whaler Restoration – Rub Rail Part #1

It took me about 6 combined hours, but 2 pieces of the 3 part rub rail have been installed onto the hull. Blisters and sore forearms aside, I was very happy not to run into any issues, and again, am more than happy with how it turned out. The OEM rubrail that came on this model back in 1974 was black, but I opted for all white. The original installation was done with rivets every 6 inches, but I opted for self-tapping, self-sealing stainless steel screws. Again, these are tapped at 6 inch intervals. (3 inches at both curves at the bow). This job could not have been done without the heat gun and several clamps, as the white plastic track that the rubber rail slides into is extremely rigid…
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